Alexander Horstmann & Anusorn Unno

Editors’ Introduction– At the Margins of the Siamese Kingdom: Violent Conflict in Southern Thailand

The Thai or Siamese kingdom has always understood itself as a homogeneous imagined national community, in which the Siamese in the Center of Ayutthaya and Bangkok have gradually expanded to the frontiers in the North, Northeast and the South and have, in the rulers understanding, civilising the wild and barbarian peoples living at the edge of the nation. Peoples living in Southern Thailand were divided between Buddhists in upper Southern Thailand until Songkhla, while Muslims tended to dominate the lower part of Southern Thailand, beginning in Pattani. The city of Nakhorn Sri Thammarat used to be the central military garrison, from which the Siamese kingdom expanded towards the lower South, only to be stopped by the British. In Southern Thailand, the Thai Buddhist civilisation met with the Malay Muslim civilisation in the Malay peninsula, marginalising the indigenous people from the coastal regions and the islands, living in the maritime worlds of the oceans. In the lower South, Malay Muslim local elites [...]

Duncan McCargo

Don Pathan

Alisa Hasamoh

The Blooming Years

This collection of articles from the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (KRSEA) is published with the financial support of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), Kyoto University.

We have compiled all the English articles from Issue 13 (March 2013), to Issue 20 (September 2016). This period marked a turning point for KRSEA with the re-launch of the website in March 2013 and the new online archive of earlier issues.

Currently, there are two thematic issues per year. Each issue is organized around a subject important to public discussion. We work closely with other communities aside from the academic one in order to broaden our discussion, understanding, debate and argument.

Pavin Chachavalpongpun
Chief Editor

RECENT TRENDSETTERS ARTICLES

Issue 28

Kingdom’s Edge by Richard Humphries

My journey into Thailand’s deep south began in late 2005 with a minivan journey from the southern Thai city of Hat Yai to Pattani. I was living in Malaysia at that time, and about to […]

Issue 27

Migrant Workers and the PAP: Who is Dependent on Whom?

Throughout the Covid-19 crisis, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and other high-ranking ministers of the Singapore government have repeatedly expressed gratitude to migrant construction workers for their role in building the gleaming city-state. These low-paid […]

TRENDSETTERS

Indonesia’s Democratic Trajectory: An Agrarian Political Economy Perspective

by Iqra Anugrah in Issue 28

The image of Indonesia as an agrarian nation, a modern country whose agricultural roots should not be forgotten, remains popular in Indonesian political discourses. Cliché as it may be, Indonesian politicians embrace this notion – or at least pay a lip service to it (Davidson 2018). The latest general elections held last year also showed how political hopefuls tried to outperform each other in their pro-peasant and pro-rural rhetoric. Ironically, this is in stark contrast with the realities of local agrarian conditions in post-authoritarian Indonesia. Although peasants and sympathetic activists [...]

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